ID: 65904
Title: Fractal dimension of protein–protein interactions: a tool for cancer protein identification
Author: Sminu Izudheen, Bee Fateema T. Shiras, R. Anamika, Annie Jaimy and R. Anna
Editor: S.K.Satheesh
Year: 2024
Publisher: Current Science Association and Indian Academy of Sciences.
Source: ENVIS, CES & EWRG, CES
Reference: Current Science Vol. 126 (12) 25 June 1454-1463 (2024)
Subject: Fractal dimension of protein–protein interactions: a tool for cancer protein identification
Keywords: Betweenness centrality, cancer gene identification, degree centrality, eigenvector centrality, protein interaction network
Abstract: Early cancer diagnosis is critical as it can help avoid the risks associated with long-term treatments and even prevent death. Identifying a defining trait of a cancer protein within its protein–protein interaction (PPI) network could lead to a significant breakthrough in accelerating early cancer detection. A systematic analysis of various topological properties of cancer proteins in the PPI network, focused on their fractal dimension, was conducted. It was observed that cancer proteins exhibit a high fractal dimension (with an average of 1.21). Those with the highest fractal dimension play a significant role in multiple mutation pathways. The observation that TP53 protein occupying high fractal dimension of 1.68, connected with 48 communities reaffirm the correctness of the approach. Further research in this area will provide valuable insights into the structural and functional complexity of cellular processes regulated by proteins, leading to the development of robust therapeutic approaches and enhancing our understanding of cancer biology.
Location: T E 15 New Biology building
Literature cited 1: Shah, S. D. and Braun, R., GeneSurrounder: network-based identification of disease genes in expression data. BMC Bioinf., 2019, 20, 229; doi.org/10.1186/s12859-019-2829-y. Hu, K. et al., Predicting disease-related genes by path structure and community in protein–protein networks. J. Stat. Mech.: Theory Exp., 2018, 10, 100001; doi:10.48550/arXiv.1707.06.846.
Literature cited 2: Ivanov, A. A., Explore protein–protein interactions for cancer target discovery using the OncoPPi portal. Method. Mol. Biol., 2020, 2074, 145–164; doi:10.1007/978-1-4939-9873-9_12. Gulfidan, G. et al., Pan-cancer mapping of differential protein protein interactions. Sci. Rep., 2020, 10, 3272; doi: org/10.1038/ s41598-020-60127-x.


ID: 65903
Title: Market competition for imported agricultural raw materials in the Indian animal feed industry
Author: Partha Pratim Saikia , Sanjib Bhuyan, Dipanjan Kashyap and Kishor Goswami
Editor: S.K.Satheesh
Year: 2024
Publisher: Current Science Association and Indian Academy of Sciences.
Source: ENVIS, CES & EWRG, CES
Reference: Current Science Vol. 126 (12) 25 June 1446-1453 (2024)
Subject: Market competition for imported agricultural raw materials in the Indian animal feed industry
Keywords: Agricultural feed ingredients, feed industry, import competition
Abstract: The Indian animal feed industry, crucial for sustaining the country’s livestock and poultry sector, heavily relies on a diverse range of feed ingredients such as soybean meal, corn, wheat, broken rice, and various energy and protein sources. Several of these commodities are in short supply for various reasons, including but not limited to stagnant productivity. Most of these commodities are imported from the world market to meet the supply shortage. The present study investigates the market competition among the exporting countries from which India imports 13 specific agricultural raw materials for feed ingredients over the decennial years of 2000, 2010 and 2020. We utilize data from the United Nations Comtrade database. Our analysis reveals India’s significant dependency on specific Asian nations, notably China, as a key source of these agricultural raw material imports. Import costs vary, prompting India to diversify its sources of imports of these agricultural commodities, spanning different continents. Such diversification of import sources is largely driven by cost-effectiveness in a competitive global market. This study provides valuable insights into India’s import dynamics and trade partnerships on these key agricultural commodities used by the feed industries (as well as some food industries), thereby offering essential information for the feed industry, commodity traders and policymakers.
Location: T E 15 New Biology building
Literature cited 1: United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), India: Grain and feed annual, Global Agricultural Information Network, GAIN Report Number IN9025, New Delhi, 2019. GoI, 20th Livestock Census – 2019: All India Report, Animal Husbandry Statistics Division, Department of Animal Husbandry and Dairying, Ministry of Fisheries, Animal Husbandry and Dairying, Krishi Bhawan, New Delhi, 2019.
Literature cited 2: USDA, India: Grain and feed annual, New Delhi, 2021; https:// www.fas.usda.gov/data/india-grain-and-feed-annual-5 (accessed on 5 May 2023). Press Information Bureau (PIB), Import of food grains and value added food products, 2022; https://pib.gov.in/PressReleasePage. aspx?PRID=1884237 (accessed on 9 May 2023).


ID: 65902
Title: Understanding the influence of diabetes on wound healing and exploring effective management study
Author: Deepraj Singh Rautela , Saumya Das, Avijit Mazumder , Bhawana Sharma, Fahad Khan and M. V. N. L. Chaitanya
Editor: S.K.Satheesh
Year: 2024
Publisher: Current Science Association and Indian Academy of Sciences.
Source: ENVIS, CES & EWRG, CES
Reference: Current Science Vol. 126 (12) 25 June 1421-1423 (2024)
Subject: Understanding the influence of diabetes on wound healing and exploring effective management study
Keywords: Angiogenesis, collagen, diabetes mellitus, growth factor, remodelling, ulcers, wounds.
Abstract: Diabetes is a diverse metabolic disease that is caused by increased levels of blood glucose, which also leads to the generation of several other complications. The formation of wounds and their delayed healing are among the main areas of concern. Wound repair is a process, which replaces damaged cells with healthy cells; it generally occurs in four steps – haemostasis, inflammation, proliferation and remodelling. This review covers the causes of diabetes mellitus, its prevalence, its impact on wound healing, different types of wounds and their management. Diabetes mellitus impairs wound healing through several mechanisms such as impaired angiogenesis, altered collagen production, etc.
Location: T E 15 New Biology building
Literature cited 1: Silva, P. A. O. et al., Systemic conditions of diabetic patients diagnosed with apical periodontitis. RGO Rev. Gaúch. Odontol., 2021, 69, 1–15; doi:10.1590/1981-863720210005020190110. Giri, B., Dey, S., Das, T., Sarkar, M., Banerjee, J. and Dash, S. K., Chronic hyperglycemia mediated physiological alteration and metabolic distortion leads to organ dysfunction, infection, cancer progression and other pathophysiological consequences: an update on glucose toxicity. Biomed. Pharmacother., 2018, 107, 306–328; doi:10.1016/j.biopha.2018.07.157.
Literature cited 2: Lotfy, M., Adeghate, J., Kalasz, H., Singh, J. and Adeghate, E., Chronic complications of diabetes mellitus: a mini review. Curr. Diabetes Rev., 2017, 13(1), 3–10; doi:10.2174/1573399812666151- 016101622. International Diabetes Federation. IDF Diabetes Atlas, 2020, 10th edn; https://www.diabetesatlas.org


ID: 65901
Title: When 2023 is the International millet year, are healthcare professionals aware about millets?
Author: Swagata Dilip Tavhare, Asmita Wele and Gunvant Yeola
Editor: S.K.Satheesh
Year: 2024
Publisher: Current Science Association and Indian Academy of Sciences.
Source: ENVIS, CES & EWRG, CES
Reference: Current Science Vol. 126 (12) 25 June 1431-1437 (2024)
Subject: When 2023 is the International millet year, are healthcare professionals aware about millets?
Keywords: Global health, healthcare, nutrition, therapeutic foods, traditional diet, SDG 3, year of millets.
Abstract: Millets are smart foods that have noteworthy nutritional and therapeutic benefits. Regular consumption of millets is beneficial as it manages postprandial glucose levels, lowers insulin resistance, positively affects HbA1c, reduces the risk of atherosclerotic changes and cardiovascular disease, lowers LDL and improves hypertension. The Government of India has taken a lead role in launching strategies for the promotion of millets to make India a global hub. Stakeholders associated with healthcare play a major role in advising millet-based diets. The present article of a questionnaire-based survey brings an analysis of knowledge, attitude and practices of healthcare professionals in our university regarding millet consumption. It is observed that a sizable number of participants (62%) could identify different types of millets; 66.4% of participants routinely consumed millet foods since childhood; 54% wish that it should be a part of therapeutic diet recommendation, but most of the participants are not completely aware of the therapeutic benefits of millets.
Location: T E 15 New Biology building
Literature cited 1: Vetriventhan, M. et al., Genetic and genomic resources, and breeding for accelerating improvement of small millets: current status and future interventions. Nucleus, 2020, 63, 217–239. 2. Kane-Potaka, J. and Kumar, P., Smart food – food that is good for you, the planet and the farmer. In State of India’s Livelihoods Report 2019, Access Development Services, New Delhi, 2019, pp. 71–82; https://livelihoods-india.org/publications/all-page-soil-report.html#; www.smartfood.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/SOIL-SmartFoods.pdf (accessed on 29 January 2024).
Literature cited 2: Willett, W. et al., Food in the anthropocene: the EAT-Lancet commission on healthy diets from sustainable food systems. Lancet Commiss., 2021, 393, 447–492. Anitha, S. et al., A systematic review and meta-analysis of the potential of millets for managing and reducing the risk of developing diabetes mellitus. Front. Nutr., 2021, 8, 687428.


ID: 65900
Title: An emerging groundwater crisis in parts of Chhattisgarh state, India
Author: Sudarsan Sahu, Shikhar Panday, Twinkle Chaddha, Sangam Samal, Vishal, Sudhanshu, Masarul Islam, Ramakant Mishra, Mahendra Chouhan, Dhiren K. Mahanta, Josabanta Jani, Subhransu Sekhar Rout and Satyaban Sahoo
Editor: S.K.Satheesh
Year: 2024
Publisher: Current Science Association and Indian Academy of Sciences.
Source: ENVIS, CES & EWRG, CES
Reference: Current Science Vol. 126 (12) 25 June 1421-1423 (2024)
Subject: An emerging groundwater crisis in parts of Chhattisgarh state, India
Keywords: None
Abstract: Chhattisgarh is an agrarian state, with about 80% of the state’s population working in agriculture and allied fields. Paddy is the principal crop, and the central plains of the state are known as the rice bowl of central India. Around 33% of the area of the state is under cultivation. The net sown area in 2022 in the state was 4.63 million hectares, with irrigation facilities in ~45% of the area1 . Multiple cropping seasons are practiced in about 23% of the net sown area. Groundwater forms a significant component of irrigation water, and an average of 84% of the entire draft is used for this purpose in the state2 . The use of bore wells (BWs) for groundwater irrigation in the state has witnessed a nine-fold increase during the last 30 years3 . This has caused an overall increase in groundwater development from 3.31% in 1990 to 47.2% in 2023. As per the recent estimations2 , out of the total 146 assessment units (blocks), there are 5 units in ‘critical’ and 22 in ‘semi-critical’ categories (with groundwater extraction >90% and between 70% and 90% of the annual recharge of the aquifer respectively). Consequently, depletion in water levels is being reported across the state4 . It is pertinent to note here that the water levels in several parts of the country have declined to unsustainable levels5 owing to uncontrolled groundwater extraction for irrigation and other uses6 . The decline in water level may lead to several adverse impacts (other than reduction in freshwater availability and increase in pumping cost), such as drying up/reduction in flow/storage in surface water bodies/streams, drying up/shrinkage of wetlands, land subsidence and further reduction in aquifer storage, reduction/ elimination of vegetation, deterioration in groundwater quality, etc.
Location: T E 15 New Biology building
Literature cited 1: CGGOVT, Chhattisgarh Government. Table of Agriculture Statistics. Office of the Commissioner Land Record, Raipur, Chhattisgarh, 2022. CGWB, National Compilation on Dynamic Ground Water Resources of India, Central Ground Water Board, Department of Water Resources, RD & GR, Ministry of Jal Shakti, Government of India, 2023.
Literature cited 2: Mukherjee, A., Verma, J. R. and Tewari, D., Bhujal News, 2011 Sonkusare, M. M., Sahu, S., Naik, P. K., Gupta, P. and Kumar, U., Bhujal News, 2023.


ID: 65899
Title: An overview of planarian species used for testing the effect of pharmaceuticals and contaminants on regeneration
Author: Deepika Eknath Walunj and Ravindra Vasant Kshirsagar
Editor: S.K.Satheesh
Year: 2024
Publisher: Current Science Association and Indian Academy of Sciences.
Source: ENVIS, CES & EWRG, CES
Reference: Current Science Vol. 126 (12) 25 June 1419-1420 (2024)
Subject: An overview of planarian species used for testing the effect of pharmaceuticals and contaminants on regeneration
Keywords: None
Abstract: Planarians have a remarkable ability to regenerate lost body parts, including the brain, auricle, eye spots, etc. They have been excellent model systems for pharmaceutical studies, including regenerative medicine, toxicology and drug testing. An overview of currently available planarian model species used for studying the effects of contaminants and pharmaceuticals on regeneration is important for initiating studies in laboratories for the first time and developing indigenous model species. The present study provides a list of currently used planarian model species around the globe and in India. The analysis highlights the lack of taxonomic studies providing accurate identification of planarian species in India and unavailability of indigenous model species.
Location: T E 15 New Biology building
Literature cited 1: Bely, A. E. and Nyberg, K. G., Trends Ecol. Evol., 2010, 25, 161–170. Tiozzo, S. and Copley, R. R., Front. Ecol. Evol., 2015, 3, 67.
Literature cited 2: Sánchez Alvarado, A., Bioessays, 2000, 22, 578–590. Elliott, S. A. and Sánchez Alvarado, A., WIREs Dev. Biol., 2013, 2, 301–326. 5. Sunderland, M. E., J. Hist. Biol., 2010, 43, 325–361.


ID: 65898
Title: Digital twin for community driven development
Author: (Interviewed by Nibedita Mohanta)
Editor: Sanjay Kumar
Year: 2024
Publisher: Sanjay Kumar
Source: ENVIS, CES & EWRG, CES
Reference: Geospatial artha Volume 03 Issue 1 50-52 (2024)
Subject: Digital twin for community driven development
Keywords: None
Abstract: Nibedita Mohanta: How GIS data can be better used with disruptive technologies like AI/ML and IoT etc.? Nagaraja Rao Harshadeep: A lot of different technologies can be leveraged such a new sensors, be it sensors on the ground in terms of being able to generate data relating to the flow of water, its quality, or soil moisture, all the way to sensors in satellites, or drones for aerial surveys of large areas to get a synoptic view of world.
Location: T E 15 New Biology building
Literature cited 1:
Literature cited 2:


ID: 65897
Title: Enhancing Inian railways operational efficiency
Author: (Interviewed by Jeffy Jacob)
Editor: Sanjay Kumar
Year: 2024
Publisher: Sanjay Kumar
Source: ENVIS, CES & EWRG, CES
Reference: Geospatial artha Volume 03 Issue 1 48-49 (2024)
Subject: Enhancing Inian railways operational efficiency
Keywords: None
Abstract: Jeffy Jacob: In the integration of geospatial data with the Indian Railway's vast network and information systems, how does the Ministry envision enhancing operational efficiency and improving safety, particularly at rural levels crossings, through this integration? Achal Jain: The integration of geospatial data into our systems is aimed at significantly enhancing operational efficiency and safety. Our GIS portal, with over 99 data layers, empowers various functionalities like Train Tracking and Patrol Monitoring where IoT sensors on trains enable real time tracking, while a patrolman tracking app integrated with GIS improves monitoring of track inspections.
Location: T E 15 New Biology building
Literature cited 1:
Literature cited 2:


ID: 65896
Title: Transforming food systems
Author: (Interviewed by Sachin Awana)
Editor: Sanjay Kumar
Year: 2024
Publisher: Sanjay Kumar
Source: ENVIS, CES & EWRG, CES
Reference: Geospatial artha Volume 03 Issue 1 38-41 (2024)
Subject: Transforming food systems
Keywords: None
Abstract: Sachin Awana: Conserving freshwater ecosystems has become paramount as water scarcity hits key cities such as Bangalore. With increasing demand and pollution hitting the ecosystem, what can be done for conserving country's wetlands and freshwater reserves? Shivaprakash Nagaraju: India has 4% of world's freshwater resources, however this resource has come under increasing demographic stress since India is home to about 18 % of world population. As per recent estimates, fresh water wetlands in India cover 58.2 million hectares, of which at least 15.98 million ha of wetlands in India at least 2.25 ha in size.
Location: T E 15 New Biology building
Literature cited 1:
Literature cited 2:


ID: 65895
Title: Versatile applications of synthetic aperture radar
Author: Raj Kumar
Editor: Sanjay Kumar
Year: 2024
Publisher: Sanjay Kumar
Source: ENVIS, CES & EWRG, CES
Reference: Geospatial artha Volume 03 Issue 1 15-19 (2024)
Subject: Versatile applications of synthetic aperture radar
Keywords: None
Abstract: The recent advancements in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) technology have significantly enhanced its capabilities and expanded its applications. Advances in technology have led to the development of systems capable of capturing images with unprecedented detail. High resolution-SAR images can now be used for various applications, including urban planning, infrastructure monitoring, and environmental assessment.
Location: T E 15 New Biology building
Literature cited 1:
Literature cited 2:


ID: 65894
Title: Data sharing critical develop early warning systems
Author: (Interview) Nibedita Mohanta
Editor: Sanjay Kumar
Year: 2024
Publisher: Sanjay Kumar
Source: ENVIS, CES & EWRG, CES
Reference: Geospatial artha Volume 03 Issue 1 12-14 (2024)
Subject: Data sharing critical develop early warning systems
Keywords: None
Abstract: Nibedita: What were the challenges that you faced while developing India's first tsunami warning system? Dr. Shailesh Nayak: At that time, there was not much knowledge about tsunami and what could be the components of the tsunami warning system. The other major issue was the technology, how to put all other things together to detect the earthquake, because 90 %of the tsunami are generated by the earthquake. Whatever system we had to detect, the Cisco Grafters, were within India and the tsunami genic zones were Indonesia and the Andaman coast, which are outside Indian mainland. In order to detect, you need to pinpoint correctly, for which you need a system on both the sides of the earthquake.
Location: T E 15 New Biology building
Literature cited 1:
Literature cited 2:


ID: 65893
Title: Impact of rainfall and slope conditions on soil organic carbon dynamics under tea and coffee land cover in Western Ghats Mountain ranges, India
Author: K. Rajan, R. Ragupathy , D. Dinesh , Deepthi Eswar , P. Raja and U. Surendran
Editor: S.K.Satheesh
Year: 2024
Publisher: Current Science Association and Indian Academy of Sciences.
Source: ENVIS, CES & EWRG, CES
Reference: Current Science Vol. 126 (11) 1384-1389 10 June (2024)
Subject: Impact of rainfall and slope conditions on soil organic carbon dynamics under tea and coffee land cover in Western Ghats Mountain ranges, India
Keywords: Coffee, rainfall, slope, soil organic carbon, tea, Western Ghats Mountain.
Abstract: Impact of rainfall and slopes on soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics was assessed under tea and coffee plantations, land covers, in Western Ghats Mountain (WGM). Severe water erosion in the western side of WGM by heavy rainfall and land sloppiness recorded less SOC (3.07%) compared to the eastern side (4.03%) in tea plantations. Similar trend in SOC was observed in coffee plantations, with 1.98% in western side and 3.25% in eastern side. Loss of soil organic carbon stock under tea plantations in western sides was 0.346 million tonnes and in coffee plantations it was 0.190 million tonnes. Hence, the total organic carbon loss was 0.536 million tonnes. Highest SOC content and stocks were recorded in steep slopes in tea and coffee plantations due to dense biomass cover and adoption of soil and water conservation measures
Location: T E 15 New Biology building
Literature cited 1: Siler, N. and Roe, G., How will orographic precipitation respond to surface warming? an idealized thermodynamic perspective. Geophys. Res. Lett., 2014, 41, 2606–2613. Lozano-García, B., Parras-Alcántara, L. and Brevik, E. C., Impact of topographic-aspect and vegetation on soil organic-carbon and nitrogen-budgets in Mediterranean natural-areas. Sci. Total Environ., 2016, 544, 963–970.
Literature cited 2: Chaplot, V. and Poesen, J., Sediment, soil organic carbon and runoff delivery at various spatial scales. Catena, 2012, 88, 46–56. Valentin, C. et al., Runoff and sediment losses from 27 upland catchments in Southeast Asia: impact of rapid land use changes and conservation practices. Agric. Ecosyst. Environ., 2008, 128, 225–238.


ID: 65892
Title: Ironmaking at Hastinapur archaeological site from 8th century BCE to 16th century CE
Author: Dibishada Brajasundar Garnayak , Siva Sankar Panda , Mainak Gantait , Rajan Kumar Verma and Gautam Anand
Editor: S.K.Satheesh
Year: 2024
Publisher: Current Science Association and Indian Academy of Sciences.
Source: ENVIS, CES & EWRG, CES
Reference: Current Science Vol. 126 (11) 1381-1384 10 June (2024)
Subject: Ironmaking at Hastinapur archaeological site from 8th century BCE to 16th century CE
Keywords: Ancient iron technology, archaeometallurgy, iron slag, metallography.
Abstract: Hastinapur is one of the prominent painted grey ware archaeological sites in the Ganga Valley. In the present communication, we report the results of the metallurgical analysis of the excavated slag samples from the site. The existence of a large number of iron objects for this site can be dated between c. 6th century BCE and c. 16th century CE, with early iron from the 8th century BCE. The morphological, microstructural and elemental studies of the excavated slag indicate a high amount of carbon in iron, indicating crucible carburization activities at this site. In addition, the presence of niobium, cobalt, etc. in the slag indicates the usage of non-traditional iron ores in the primary ironmaking stage.
Location: T E 15 New Biology building
Literature cited 1: Lal, B. B., Excavation at Hastinapura and other explorations in the upper Ganga and Satluj basins 1950–52: new light on the dark age between the end of Harrappa culture and the early historical period, Ancient India. Bulletin of Archaeological Survey of India, No. 10 and 11, 1954–55, pp. 5–151. Levin, A. A., Meyer, D. C., Reibold, M., Kochmann, W., Pätzke, N. and Paufler, P., Microstructure of a genuine Damascus sabre. Cryst. Res. Technol., 2005, 40(9), 905–916
Literature cited 2: Verhoeven, J. D., The mystery of Damascus blades. Sci. Am., 2001, 284(1), 74–79. Srinivasan, S. and Ranganathan, S., India’s Legendary Wootz Steel: An Advanced Material of the Ancient World, National Institute of Advanced Studies, Bengaluru, India, 2004, pp. 1–153.


ID: 65891
Title: Field evaluation of indigenous Spodoptera frugiperda nucleopolyhedrovirus NBAIR1 for the management of maize fall armyworm in India
Author: Sivakumar Gopalsamy, Ram Kumar Pandi , Mohan Muthugounder , Venkatesan Thiruvengadam , Kannan Malaichamy , Kandan Aravindaram , Manjunatha Channappa , Rangeshwaran Rajagopal , Subaharan Kesavan and Sushil Satya Nand
Editor: S.K.Satheesh
Year: 2024
Publisher: Current Science Association and Indian Academy of Sciences.
Source: ENVIS, CES & EWRG, CES
Reference: Current Science Vol. 126 (11) 1377-1380 10 June (2024)
Subject: Field evaluation of indigenous Spodoptera frugiperda nucleopolyhedrovirus NBAIR1 for the management of maize fall armyworm in India
Keywords: Fall armyworm, invasive, maize, nucleopolyhedrovirus, Spodoptera frugiperda.
Abstract: The bioefficacy of an indigenous Spodoptera frugiperda nucleopolyhedrovirus (SpfrNPV) National Bureau of Agricultural Insect Resources 1 (NBAIR1) infecting maize fall armyworm (FAW) was evaluated under field conditions. In 2019, FAW infestation on maize was less after two sprays of emamectin benzoate (19.04%) followed by S. frugiperda nucleopolyhedrovirus ICAR-NBAIR1 (21.90%) and control (80.00%). In 2020, FAW infestation on maize was less after two sprays of emamectin benzoate (16.19%) followed by S. frugiperda nucleopolyhedrovirus ICAR-NBAIR1 (19.04%) and untreated control (69.52%). Field trial results revealed that there was 72.6% reduction in FAW infestation and 57.6% increase in the grain yield from the SpfrNPV NBAIR1- treated plots during 2019 and 2020. It is concluded that SpfrNPV NBAIR1 is a potential isolate to manage the FAW infestation
Location: T E 15 New Biology building
Literature cited 1: Shylesha, A. N. et al., Studies on new invasive pest Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and its natural enemies. J. Biol. Control., 2018, 32(3), 145–151. Mutyambai, D. M., Niassy, S., Calatayud, P. A. and Subramanian, S., Agronomic factors influencing fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) infestation and damage and its co-occurrence with stem borers in maize cropping systems in Kenya. Insects, 2022, 13, 266
Literature cited 2: Sivakumar, G. et al., Natural occurrence of entomopathogens on the invasive fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) in South India. Curr. Sci., 2021, 120(4), 619–621. Sagheer, M., Ashfaq, M., Hasan, M.-ul. and Rana, S. A., Integration of some biopesticides and Trichogramma chilonis for the sustainable management of rice leaf folder Cnaphalocrocis medinalis (Guenee) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae). Pak. J. Agric. Sci., 2008, 45(1), 69–74.


ID: 65890
Title: Antennal transcriptome of melon fly, Zeugodacus cucurbitae (Diptera: Tephritidae): identification of candidate chemosensory genes
Author: Subhash Shivaramu, Gandham Krishnarao , Meenal Vyas , Akshay Kumar Chakravarthy and Kamala Jayanthi Pagadala Damodaram
Editor: S.K.Satheesh
Year: 2024
Publisher: Current Science Association and Indian Academy of Sciences.
Source: ENVIS, CES & EWRG, CES
Reference: Current Science Vol. 126 (11) 1367-1376 10 June (2024)
Subject: Antennal transcriptome of melon fly, Zeugodacus cucurbitae (Diptera: Tephritidae): identification of candidate chemosensory genes
Keywords: Antennae, chemosensory genes, melon fly, olfaction, transcriptome.
Abstract: The sense of smell, or olfaction, is essential for driving insect behaviours associated with seeking hosts, mating, oviposition and various other activities. The melon fly, Zeugodacus cucurbitae (Coquillett) (Diptera: Tephritidae), poses a significant threat to agriculture, with its distribution spanning across the Asia-Pacific region and certain areas of Africa. Management strategies centered around olfaction, such as employing para-pheromones for population monitoring and bait-and-kill methods for male reduction, have proven effective in managing the populations of Z. cucurbitae. However, there has been a dearth of information concerning the molecular underpinnings of olfaction in Z. cucurbitae. In the present study, we conducted high-throughput sequencing to sequence and compile the antennal transcriptome of both male and female Z. cucurbitae specimens. Our aim was to identify chemoreception gene families associated with odor detection. Through this analysis, we discovered a total of 137 potential chemosensory genes, encompassing 55 odorant binding proteins (OBPs), 18 pheromone binding proteins (PBPs), 54 odorant receptors (ORs) and 10 ionotropic receptors (IRs). This study lays the groundwork for future research focused on the functional characterization of these chemosensory receptors in Z. cucurbitae at the molecular level, thereby paving the way for the development of enhanced tools for pest management.
Location: T E 15 New Biology building
Literature cited 1: Hildebrand, J. G., Analysis of chemical signals by nervous systems. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci., 1995, 92, 67–74. Grosse-wilde, E., Kuebler, L. S., Bucks, S., Vogel, H., Wicher, D. and Hansson, B. S., Antennal transcriptome of Manduca sexta. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci., 2011, 108, 7449–7454.
Literature cited 2: Leal, W. S., Odorant reception in insects: roles of receptors, binding proteins and degrading enzymes. Annu. Rev. Entomol., 2013, 58, 373–391. Araneda, R. C., Kini, A. D. and Firestein, S., The molecular receptive range of an odorant receptor. Nat. Neurosci., 2000, 3, 1248–1255.